CasaShop
  1. FK Office
    Design Jørgen Kastholm & Preben Fabricius
    Design Jørgen Kastholm & Preben Fabricius
    The Devil Wears Prada... and sits on FK. Like Meryl Streep on the screen, aficionados worldwide worship its unmistakable appearance: FK – the unique form, the clear contours, the perfect lines. The bucket seat is an icon of minimalism in design. This new interpretation of a classic emphasises the outer shell. Chic and clean, shining and stylish. The leather cover on top, inviting and familiar. The new executive chair – not only for diabolic editors-in-chief. Devilishly good.
  2. Leadchair
    Design EOOS
    Design EOOS
    The art of leadership needs excellent tools – tools for convincing management. The new Leadchair makes a clear statement: modern understatement. The result of a five-year development process, the swivel chair represents the DNA in design by Walter Knoll: modernity that remains timeless, the constant development of upholstery expertise, the elegant shaping of lines and surface, the transparency of function. Soft skills with persuasive arguments – particularly for women in the executive seat. Its appearance is all about flowing forms and clean lines. Every component and every line is precisely defined to create a harmonious whole. Soft leather modulates the elegant upholstery – a true sign of a long tradition in upholstery making. Base, rotating column, seat and back fork, and the armrests seem all of a piece. Take a seat, lean back, feel good. The angle between the seat and the backrest opens. The seat moves back and down. The supportive effect of the back can be set individually using the rotary cylinder under the seat. Healthy sitting thanks to the synchronised mechanism. Whether as an executive chair, a conference chair or a visitor chair. For that ergonomic comfort of modern leadership culture.
  3. Pollock Chair
    Design Charles Pollock (1963)
    Design Charles Pollock Design year 1963
    Charles Pollock’s 1963 Executive Chair features what he described as “rim technology”— the use of a single aluminum band around the chair’s perimeter to hold the design together, structurally and visually. Almost 50 years after its introduction, the Pollock Chair continues to exude timeless elegance.
  4. Pscc
    Design Charles & Ray Eames
    Design Charles & Ray Eames
    The Eames Plastic Chairs are renewed versions of the legendary Fiberglass Chairs. The original, which was the very first industrially produced plastic chair, was jointly developed with Zenith Plastics for the ‘Low-Cost Furniture Design’ competition organised by the Museum of Modern Art. In the current version made of polypropylene, these chairs provide even greater comfort. With its simple organic shape, the Plastic Side Chair now seems like an archetype of the genre of chairs whose shell can be combined with diverse bases. The selection of bases makes it possible to use the chairs in a wide variety of settings: from the dining room or home office to the garden. Shells come in a broad range of colours and upholstery versions, so that components can be mixed and matched to find the perfect chair for individual needs. The Eames Plastic Side Chair is complemented by the Eames Plastic Armchair with integrated armrests.
  5. Saarinen Conference Swivel Chair
    Design Eero Saarinen (1946 - 1950)
    Design Eero Saarinen Design year 1946 - 1950
    After winning the Museum of Modern Art Organic Design Competition with Charles Eames for their experiments with bent plywood in 1941, Eero Saarinen was eager to continue exploring the possibilities of a chair that achieved comfort through the shape of its shell, not the depth of its cushioning. Initially, he began the investigation with designs for smaller fiberglass task chairs, but changed direction when Florence Knoll approached him and asked, “Why not take the bull by the horns and do the big one first? I want a chair that is like a basket full of pillows…something I can curl up in.” While that’s not exactly where Saarinen ended up, the suggestion inspired one of the most iconic, and comfortable, chairs of the modern furniture movement, The Womb Chair. After completing the Womb Chair, Saarinen returned his focus to task seating, scaling down the concept and form of the womb into arm and armless chairs. Introduced as the 71 and 72 Series, the chairs replaced Florence Knoll’s model 43 chairs as the Planning Unit’s go-to seating solution. The iconic chair, often referred to as “that chair with the hole in the back,” has been a staple of the Knoll portfolio for more than 60 years.
  6. SBG 197 R
    Design Egon Eiermann (1949)
    Design Egon Eiermann Design year 1949
    Longevity has a name. The original concept – adapted to the human body, functions reduced to the bare minimum, sustainability of the materials, the clear language of form – that’s how you convince your users. No need to reinvent something really good. The universal tool for the creative. Following the example of this swivel chair, swivel chair manufacturers began developing variants for every taste and budget. The most incredible shapes and colours with even more incredible features came and went. The S 197 stayed. Comfort reduced to the essentials. With the Brussels frame, a five-star base with unique charm, in 1958 Egon Eiermann created a playful addition to the classic version for the World Expo in Brussels.
  7. Task chair
    Design Norman Cherner (1958)
    Design Norman Cherner Design year 1958
    For the home or office, the swivel base Task Chair is available with or without upholstered seat pads. With a uniquely designed chrome metal base, the Task Chair's seat height is adjustable from 16.5" to 19.5". The Task Chair utlizes the same molded plywood shell as Norman Cherner's iconic Arm and Side Chairs.